Diamond Cut

Most people confuse cut with the shape of the diamond. Cut refers to the dimensions of the diamond (the depth, width, table, girdle, etc., ). Diamonds can be cut to maintain weight (usually fair to poor cutting) or to maintain brilliance and light. Diamonds cut to near perfect proportions get the maximum brilliance, fire, light and sparkle.
The cut directly attributes to the brilliance of the diamond. The reflections and refraction of light within the stone is determined by table % and depth % for the most part. If the stone is cut to ideal specifications most light entering the stone will reflect back from the crown.

The polish and symmetry are two other important attributes of a diamond. They directly affect the sparkle of the diamond. The symmetry refers to the way the facets are aligned on the diamond. If the facets are symmetrical the light will be misdirected thus making the stone duller. The polish of the stone refers to the smoothness of the facets. If the polish is dull the sparkle is reduced.

 

Each diamond can be put in one of the following cut categories:
Ideal
- Most Beautiful Sparkle. This cut is intended to maximize brilliance, and the typically smaller table sizes of these diamonds have the added benefit of creating a great deal of dispersion or "fire" as well.
Excellent - Almost Highest Cut Grade. Most Excellent Cut diamonds have cuts that are the equal of any Ideal Cut diamond, though they often can be purchased at slightly lower prices than Ideal Cuts.
Very Good - Beautiful Sparkle. These diamonds reflect most of the light that enters them, creating a good deal of brilliance.
Good
- High Quality. Diamonds in this range offer an excellent cost-savings to customers who want to stay in a budget without sacrificing quality or beauty.
Fair
- Fair Quality. These Diamonds barely meet the proportion standards of diamond cutting.
Poor
- Poor Quality. These Diamonds do not meet the proportion standards of diamond cutting. The light reflection in these stones is minimal. My Solitaire does not carry these diamonds.

July 28, 2006  |  Back to article list